Feel the Thrill of a French Ryder Cup

Feel the Thrill of a French Ryder Cup

A Ryder Cup on the Continent is a rare thing. The last time the United States and Europe tussled on European soil was in 1997 at Valderrama Golf Club in Spain. That edition was a nail-biter, with the home team narrowly coming through by a margin of 14½ to 13½. Next year, however, the event will return to Europe once again: the Albatros Course of Le Golf National in Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines will serve as the venue from 28 to 30 September.
To make the most of the upcoming Ryder Cup, 2018 will see European Waterways offering golf fans and Francophiles alike a wonderful opportunity: a chartered golf cruise through France and the chance to be at Le Golf National to watch the world’s best competing for the game’s most coveted trophy. Here’s hoping that the 42nd Ryder Cup will be just as exciting and dramatic the one in 1997!

 

Enhance your Game on the Renaissance

Whether you choose to embark before the tournament begins to get you in the mood or decide to join a charter after the final putt is made, the hotel barge Renaissance will make sure you have many opportunities to hone your own game. As Renaissance wends its way along the Loire, it will stop at a number of quintessentially Gallic courses, such as at Château Cely and Fontainebleau.

The Ryder Cup is always a special event, but we think that next year’s is going to be a particularly exceptional one. 2018 is going to be the year when our dedicated European golf cruise truly comes into its own.

Home Soil – A Home Win?

To get your appetite whetted in advance, here’s a preview of the Ryder Cup 2018. Having comfortably beaten the European contingent with 17 points to 11 at the Hazeltine National Golf Club in Minnesota in 2016, the Americans, led by Jim Furyk, will be hoping to retain the Cup for the first time since 1993. Under the captaincy of Danish golfer Thomas Bjørn, Europe will hope that playing on home soil and the backing of the crowd will spur them on to wrest back the Cup.

As for the venue, the 18-hole L’Albatros is certainly a course befitting of such an illustrious competition. British golfer Lee Westwood encapsulated the thoughts of many of his fellow players when stating that it is his “favourite course in Europe” and that it “would make a great Ryder Cup venue”. Finished in 1990, it has acquired something of a reputation for its final 4 holes. The various water challenges to be found here are sure to test the mettle of players from both sides throughout the Ryder Cup – 2018 could see a real classic. There’ll be no such challenges for spectators, though, as L’Albatros is widely considered to provide one of the best viewing experiences in the world.

Paul Newman is the Marketing and E-Systems Executive for European Waterways, the UK’s most respected provider of all-inclusive, luxury barge holidays, which can be booked to coincide with unmissable sporting events such as the Ryder Cup 2018 or the tennis French Open. Part of a team of experienced barging aficionados, Paul is first in line to endorse the perks of a slow-paced barge cruise to anyone looking for a unique holiday experience.

Water History: Barge Building in France

Water History: Barge Building in France

Even though you may be a barge vacation lover in France, how much do you really know about the history of this mode of transportation? Although waterways are now reserved for holiday activities, tourism and barge holidays, the French have relied on simple barges to maintain and grow their economies. Actually, for centuries the canals and rivers are an important component of the French trading network, connecting the English Channel, Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. Water History: Barge Building in France
Standardization and Transportation

Despite this crucial relation of the river, transportation is sluggish due to lack of standardization across the country. At the end of the nineteenth century, Minister of Public Works, Freycinet, had a lightbulb moment: he decided to set up a waterway network by building the same sized locks across the country. This key measures 40m x 5.20m and, once installed, the ship must be redesigned to fit within it. The new timber ship, sometimes known as the ‘Freycinet barge’, is built in dimensions of 38.5m with 5.0mm as standard. This modern standard cargo ship can deliver goods across Europe. Water History: Barge Building in France

However, how do these non-motorized ships move around the complex European canal network? The answer is the power of man – even though actual pulling is done by women, horses and even children throughout the 1800s, as well as men. Some – like Klippers and Tjalks who travel to England – use screen and other power, in Belgium and Holland, are pulled by steam-powered tugs. Progress, though faster because of standardization, can not be called fast because most people will travel on foot.

Triggering the Nation

In a drastic change in how channel transportation operated, the 1900s saw the launch of a diesel engine that eliminated the need for a puller altogether. However, because the engine is not very strong, motorized vessels like Spitzen and Luxemotors must have a distinctive pointed bow similar to the pull. This new creation is very luxurious because it comes with a kitchen and toilet – more than a few houses at that time – and independent.

By the 1920’s the wooden hull had been exchanged for steel, making stronger and tougher cargo ships that could withstand potential impacts with locks. Twenty years later the diesel engine has gained more power and many motorized barges are built throughout France, Belgium and the Netherlands. This is the peak of this industry in Europe. Non-motorized ships are drawn by diesel-powered tractors, not horses, so travel time is greatly reduced.

Goodbye to all that

The decline in French water transport began in the 1970s as faster and more efficient railways and road vehicles grew in popularity. The canals, once the source of life of the country, fell into disrepair and unfortunately not restored. Hundreds of Freycinet barges were canceled and it seemed to be the end of this crucial vessel lane.

Fortunately, barge holidays in France make this traditional form of water transport alive. Tourism blossomed in the 1970s, attracting visitors to the canals and rivers of France has not subsided in nearly four decades. Barge holidays in France showcase the country’s most beautiful and interesting areas to visitors who appreciate the gentle pace, and an alternative point of view, that barge hotels give them access.

Paul Newman is a Marketing and E-Systems Executive for European Waterways, the UK’s most respected provider if you are looking for all the luxury holidays in France or other great destinations. Part of an experienced barge team, Paul first queued to support a slow-paced barging cruise facility for anyone looking for a unique holiday experience. Water History: Barge Building in France

Fun Facts About Skiing to Amuse the Kids

Fun Facts About Skiing to Amuse the Kids

I think that there is no type of family holiday that’s better than a ski holiday in a catered chalet. Family skiing trips allow you to bond, spend quality time together in a unique set-ting and try new activities. In addition to this, you definitely won’t have to spend time cooking if you book a catered chalet! You can benefit from the cosy accommodation’s roominess and great facilities. This will create many happy memories that you will all look back on fondly.
If you want to pique the kids’ enthusiasm in the run-up to the holiday, there is no better way than intriguing them with some fun facts about skiing. Here is a collection of my fa-vourites.

 

Origins

There is some debate about where the thrilling winter sport of skiing originated. Many claim that it was invented in the snowy terrain of Norway, as ancient carvings about ski-ing have been discovered in this area. Another reason for believing that it first began in Norway is that the word ‘ski’ comes from the Old Norse word skíð, which translates to ‘a piece of wood’.

Sounds like a solved case, right? Wrong! It is thought that tribesmen in the Altai Moun-tains (in Central and East Asia) were shredding powder even before the Scandinavians. A ski that dates back to approximately 8000-7000 BC was uncovered near a lake in Russia, creating an interesting debate about the true origins of this hugely popular activ-ity.

Early Form of Transportation

Back in these prehistoric days, it is unlikely that people were skiing for fun. Instead, the sport surely served as an early form of transportation. It is easy to see why, as it provides the ability to quickly travel across challenging terrain – it’s not surprising, then, that skiing was even used as a mode of transportation during the First and Second World Wars.

Heard of a Snurfer?

Let’s quickly turn our attention to snowboarding. Did you know that the very first snow-board was called a ‘snurfer’? This somewhat comical name was given to a contraption that was invented by the American Sherman Poppen in 1965, when he connected two skis to create a skateboard without wheels. Unfortunately, the funny name did not stick, but about one million snurfers were sold over the next decade.

Olympic Sport

Alpine/downhill racing originated in Sweden and dates back to 1879, but it did not be-come an Olympic event until 1936. This is unlike cross-country skiing, which has been a part of every single Winter Olympics since its inaugural year in 1924. In contrast, snow-boarding only made its Olympic debut at the 1998 Games in Nagano, Japan.

Space Skiing

This fun fact is certainly one to remember. Astronaut Harrison Schmitt, who was on the famous space shuttle Apollo 17, claims that our moon has the perfect terrain for cross-country skiing and that this technique could actually help astronauts traverse its surface. Who knows – perhaps one day families will be able to book lunar ski holidays!

Speed skiing – faster than a car!

Skiing is one of the fastest sports in the world, and some speed skiers can reach speeds that are faster than a car! Passenger cars can reach speeds of around 120 mph, whilst the current world record for skiing is a blistering 156.2 mph. This was set by the Italian skier Simone Origone in 2006.

A Global Activity

Skiing is immensely popular in modern times, and those who have experienced the adrenaline rush and awesome surroundings know why! You can find ski resorts in around 80 countries worldwide, and approximately 350 million people visit these resorts every year.

These fun facts are sure to dazzle your little ones – consider sharing them before your trip or possibly in your catered chalet after a fun day on the slopes!

All You Need is Lava: A Volcanic Hawaiian Holiday

All You Need is Lava: A Volcanic Hawaiian Holiday

Endlessly fascinating for their beauty and danger, volcanoes have thrilled us human beings for as long as we can remember. And if lazy days on the beach just aren’t for you, why not try a holiday with a little more excitement and head to the active volcanoes of Hawaii? In fact, the archipelago of Hawaii was created through volcanic activity and this fiery heritage is everywhere you look in the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, USA. Travel insurance experts, however, say it’s safe terrain.
In the park you can get so close to active volcanoes that you can feel the heat from erupting gases and steam as you walk across lava fields in search of indigenous art…

 

Here are three expeditions you should make in the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park if you want to experience the power of volcanoes first hand:

The Long One

The Crater Rim Trail is a fantastic trail for those who love their hikes with just a soupcon of danger! The trail is over 11 miles long and works itself around the summit of Kilauea, one of the most active volcanoes on Hawaii. Thousands of years old, Kilauea has been active non-stop for the last thirty years. The trail winds through contrasting sceneries of lush, green rainforests and sterile, steaming rockscapes. As you walk, look out for the earth cracks and vents that break the ground’s surface.

If you’re interested in the local culture you’ll want to know that Kilauea is believed to be the home of Pele – goddess of fire and creator of Hawaii. As the name Fire Goddess suggests, the area can be unpredictable and dangerous. With this in mind, be prepared for sudden trail closures. It’s also always advisable to stay on the marked paths and keep away from edges. Make sure you get out USA travel insurance before visiting – in case of an accident you are safely covered.

The Short One

Ha’akulamanu Trail, or the Sulphur Banks Trail, is much shorter, coming in at just over a mile in length. However, you know what they say: good things come in small packages! The intriguing landscape is devoid of trees as the intense underground heat makes it impossible for most roots to grow. The area is known for the beautiful crystal formations formed by escaping gases over many years. The gas is released through earth vents along with groundwater which is turned into steam and hangs in the air.

Just a warning – it does not smell good here! Rotten eggs anyone?

The Arty One

It’s not often that you can enjoy a nature trail and take in some local art on your way. However, nothing about this art is ordinary. The indigenous artwork found cut into Pu’u Loa, or the “Hill of Long Life”, is carved into the cooled volcanic lava of this sacred site. How amazing is that? There are over 23,000 petroglyphs showing a stunning variety of geometric patterns, human representations and images of the travels of the people of Hawaii around the island. A boardwalk allows visitors to easily view the artwork whilst protecting it and maintaining respect for the site.

TOP TIP: Before you embark on any journey, check your insurance! Designed with explorers in mind, Let’s Go Insure’s USA travel insurance will keep you covered on all your wild ventures.

Ready to have a blast? I’ll see you in Hawaii!

Ready for the Road: The World’s Most Epic Motorcycling Routes

Ready for the Road: The World’s Most Epic Motorcycling Routes

Is there anything quite like seeing the world glide by from behind your motorcycle helmet visor? Nothing but you, your buddies and the open road. The unbelievable rush of roaring along Route 66 at a tidy 75 mph beats a lazy beach holiday any day of the week.
For the ultimate rush of a roadtrip with just your bike, backpack and the road, give one of these epic adventure routes a go.

 

Route 66, USA

The mother of all road trips, this 3,939km route starts in Chicago and cuts through the country all the way to LA. Depending on how much time you have and what interests you the most, you could either drive a section of it or go the whole hog (on your hog!) and see the whole thing. It winds through Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Missouri, and doing the whole shebang would take 3 to 4 weeks according to seasoned bikers who’ve lived the legend.

With our USA travel insurance, you’ll be covered for as much of the journey as you take. Spend some more time getting to know (and win big in!) Vegas, experiencing Death Valley and admiring the Grand Canyon.

The South Island, New Zealand

This stretch of land is just breath-taking. Expect to see awe-inspiring landscapes, forests, fjords, mountains and beaches along the way. The other-worldliness of the backdrop to much of the Lord of the Rings movies will be amazing to drive along to. Other bonuses of this route include the lightness of the traffic, the smooth tarmac road surfaces, and the incredible scenery really must be mentioned again.

Stop and enjoy the Franz Josef Glacier, revisit civilisation in the city of Nelson, relax on the shores of Lake Mapourika and visit the Aspiring National Park. These are just a few attractions on the 2,100km stretch of road.

The Transalpine Route, France, Switzerland, Austria and Italy

If staying closer to home with the added bonus of bringing you bike without a huge amount of effort, this is the route for you. Starting in Grenoble in France and winding 2,400km all the way through the Alps to end in Venice, Italy, you’ve got a couple of options when it comes to traversing the Alps with more easy routes right up to a couple of more challenging ones. Expect spectacular mountain landscapes, steep gradients and a hell of a lot of tunnels, bridges and viaducts. Don’t forget to bring a load of loose change for the tolls, and don’t miss out on the climb to the Stelvio pass!

Ruta 40, Argentina

At 5,301km this is one of the world’s longest roads. It starts in Cabo Virgenes in Santa Cruz and snakes its way up to Quiaca in Jujuy, with gorgeous views the whole way along the route which runs beside the Andes. This route cuts through or drives by a whopping 20 National Parks! With incredible scenery on offer as well as the chance to ride from the South to the North of this huge country, this route is rightly popular.

Whether you opt for New Zealand, the Alps, Argentina or the USA, travel insurance by Let’s Go Insure gives you the cover you need to make the most of your roadtrip without stress.

Drive carefully and to drive safely, keep to the speed limit. Always have the necessary documentation and safety gear at hand.

Make your trip awesome with Spirit airlines free baggage policy

Make your trip awesome with Spirit airlines free baggage policy

Spirit airlines is one of the largest airlines of United States which proffer luxurious. Spirit airlines is mostly known for its best in class traveling features. Spirit airlines cover domestic and international destinations to the various countries. All three kinds of cabin classes are provided by the Spirit airlines such as First class, Business class and Economy class. Passengers can dial Spirit airlines phone number to get more information on Spirit airlines.
What size bag can you carry on Spirit airlines for free?

 

Are you traveling in Spirit airlines first time? But don’t have any knowledge about its baggage policy? Then don’t be tensed. Spirit airlines proffer cost effective baggage policy to the passengers. But there are some restrictions behind the free baggage policy of Spirit airlines. You contact Spirit airlines customer service to know more about on baggage restrictions. You can also read the below information regarding Spirit airlines baggage allowance which is given below:

· Spirit airlines permits 1 personal item such as purse, laptop bag and briefcase. · Each item should not exceed the size 56x46x25 cm including handles and wheels. · Every bag fit in the overhead bin. · For personal item should not exceed the limit 102 cm. · An umbrella, jacket, diaper bag, child food do not count in carry on allowance.

If you are not capable to understand the above baggage policy of Spirit airlines, then contact Spirit airlines booking number to avail relevant information from the certified service representatives. They will provide better information on Spirit airlines baggage policy within simple manner. You can also book your flight ticket with the help of these representatives. There is no time to contact on this number, you can dial this number at 24/7 hours across the globe.

How to Book Westjet Airlines?

How to Book Westjet Airlines?

WestJet Airlines Ltd is a economic low cost airlines operating in Canada since 1996. It began as a low cost airline to compete the major airlines in Canada and is now operating to 100s of destinations to Canada, the United States, Europe, Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean.
For booking of Westjet Airlines Reservation Number tickets follow the steps

 

1. Open westjet site and login into your account if you have one or create an account or continue as a guest.

2. Click on book and then select book flight.

3. you can choose flights or multicity option

4. Enter your from and too destinations and then choose the number of adults , childrens and infants travelling .

5. Enter the date of your journey and click on get flight ,select the flight you want to travel and enter all the details of passengers.

6. Now choose the payment options and make the payment to finalize your reservation.

The various ways to contact the westjet airline ltd is as under.

1. WestJet provides social media support 24 x 7 , they can be contacted on facebook or twitter to get any kind of info you want . the only limitation is that no payment transaction can be completed of social media.

2. Westjet is always ready to hear from you and share your feedback through email . Your just select your concern and put your comments and fwd it to westjet. You will get a reply.

3. Contacting Westjet on phone is very easy. The lsit of various countries with their phone number is listed just click on the country you are calling from to get the number.Charges as applicable will apply.

4.. For international toll-free numbers charges may apply from hotels or payphones so use international dialing prefix. 5. You can also make a Westjet Airlines Customer Service request and choose the subject you want assistance on.

Underwater Shipwrecks: The Most Dramatic of Dive Sites

Underwater Shipwrecks: The Most Dramatic of Dive Sites

Whether you’re a seasoned diver or just starting out, there’s an undeniable romanticism and sense of adventure around wreck dives that you won’t be able to get elsewhere. The excitement builds while you’re in a speedboat zipping through the immense expanse of blue, wind whipping your hair and you into a frenzy. Often you’ll not spot any signs of civilisation as far as the eye can see and then, suddenly, with all your gear securely in place, it’s overboard and underwater into a magical world where ghostly ship remains loom as if from nowhere, waiting to be explored…
If this sounds tempting, the reality is much better. Do these thrilling historical sites offering spectacular dives, stunning reefs and enchanting folklore call to you? Great: here are three of the best this fine planet has to offer.

 

Townsville, Australia

The Great Barrier Reef is the a fabulous dive site any diver worth their salt has explored, and this British-built luxury passenger ship which fell victim to a cyclone back in 1911 is arguably its crowning jewel. Teeming with marine life and a spectacular ship in itself, if you’re only ever going to take the plunge with one wreck dive ever then this should be a strong contender.

Grand Anse, Grenada

The Bianca C has become known as the Titanic of the Caribbean after it sank in 1961 due to a boiler room explosion and consequent fire which lasted several days. At 180 metres (600 feet) long, this is the largest shipwreck you can dive in the Caribbean. If you have your full wreck dive insurance certifications then you’re in for even more fun as you’ll have multiple chances to enter the wreck.

Chuuk Lagoon, Federated States of Micronesia

Are you on the hunt for a travel destination which boasts a true wealth of wreck diving options? Then look no further than Micronesia. This little section of paradise in Oceania is undoubtedly the place for you. In years gone by it was thought to be the most formidable of Japanese strongholds in the whole of the Pacific during WWII, and Chuuk Lagoon was completely devastated after an American attack on the base back in 1944. 249 aircraft, 32 merchant ships and 12 warships sank, with over 20 wrecks having been discovered since. You’ll be like a kid in a sweetshop deciding which dives to do — some of the most popular include the 500 foot (153 metre) Shikoku Maru and the 440 foot (134 metre) Fujikawa Maru.

Mayday Mayday!

Not every travel insurance covers you for wreck diving, and some dive insurance won’t cover you below 18 metres. Let’s Go Insure’s dive insurance provides cover for up to 50 metres as long as you have the necessary qualifications. Get in touch with our team today to make sure your once in a lifetime dive insurance needs are met.

The Culinary Charm of Chamonix

The Culinary Charm of Chamonix

Renowned for its superb skiing and breath-taking scenery, Chamonix also has some truly divine places to dine. Here are a few of the best restaurants this charming ski resort has on offer all year round.
Le Cap Horn

 

This well-known and highly-regarded restaurant offers up both French and Asian-inspired plates. Dishes include a delicious honey and soy sauce pan-seared duck breast, their sumptuous fisherman’s stew and the lighter-than-air souffle au Grand Marnier.

The restaurant is situated in a beautifully rustic chalet which is decorated with little model sail boats. Make sure you reserve your table in advance at the weekend during summer and winter to avoid disappointment.

Les Vieilles Luges

Reachable only by 20-minute hike or on skis, you will certainly have earned your supper at this delightful 250-year-old farmhouse when you make it there. Sit by a crackling fire and soak up the atmosphere underneath the low wooden beams, all the while enjoying rich dishes including their signature grand-mère’s bœuf bourguignon. Wash it down with some of their very tasty mulled wine.

Crèmerie du Glacier

For all fromage fanatics among you, this cheese-lover’s paradise is a must-visit when in Chamonix. A forest chalet is the setting for Chef Claudy’s world-renowned croûte aux fromages: bread, soaked in a secret recipe white wine sauce, topped with a healthy layer of some of the best cheese in the country and baked until golden and delicious.

Auberge du Bois Prin

It’s well worth the effort heading to Les Moussoux to dine at Auberge du Bois Prin if only for the stunning views of Mont Blanc it boasts. The views, as spectacular as they are, certainly won’t be the most memorable aspect of your time here. Sample modern and traditional French plates from duck foie gras to mousseline, and don’t skip the cheese course, which is simply delectable! For those of you concerned about food miles, you will be delighted to learn that all of the vegetables and herbs used in the menu are grown in the hotel grounds, which you can look over should you choose to dine on the terrace – well worth braving the winter temperatures for!

How to Get There

Is your mouth already watering? Don’t worry – you can be in Chamonix in a jiffy! With several flights taking only 90 minutes leaving daily from the UK to Geneva, part one of your journey is simple. For part two, to get from Geneva to Chamonix you simply need to book a Shuttle Direct transfer online to bring you directly to the resort. Choose from group or private transfers and receive the same professional and friendly service every time. With journey times from Geneva to Chamonix taking approximately one hour, you could be there in time for dinner.

Serenity and sleek modern

Serenity and sleek modern

Axelrod Architects transforms a Tel Aviv home from ’80s glitz to no-nonsense, modern cool…
Axelrod Architects, led by Principal Irit Axelrod, transforms a 5500-sq. ft., two-storey, single-family house in Tel Aviv to reflect the homeowners’ love of serenity and sleek modern design, and the firm’s vision of modern residential architecture.

Serenity and sleek modern

The new homeowners wanted to remodel an existing 1980’s house to reflect their indoor-outdoor lifestyle. Their family life is now centred around a lush landscaped courtyard just outside their living-dining space. Axelrod Architects organized the house around a new ‘Black Core’, a glossy, black glass elevator that connects the living spaces below to the private sleeping spaces above. The living space opens out to nature with sliding, clear glass openings, while opening upward to the bedroom level with open balconies and a double-height ceiling. An open reading/media area tucked away upstairs allows the family to see each other, while still finding quiet space for relaxation. The entry facade of white concrete and matte stucco is perforated by vertical openings and horizontal slits that reveal the indoor-outdoor nature of the home within, presenting a sleek modernist face to the quiet, upscale neighbourhood of Tel Aviv.

The glass surface of the black core inside reflects images of landscape throughout the house, reinforcing the idea of living in nature. The simple clarity of contrasting surfaces – in black and white or glossy and matte – is one of the unifying characteristics repeated in the interior design and the architecture of the building envelope. The home espouses Irit Axelrod’s modern visual language, influenced by numerous international styles and Bauhaus buildings Serenity and sleek modern